Why you should take part in the Research Poster Conference

Presenting your research in a poster format might seem like a daunting task, but there are many reasons that this is an essential task for PGRs. Jenna Clake, from the College of Arts and Law, shared her experience of participating in the Conference with us…

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I presented my research at the Research Poster Conference last year, with a poster entitled ‘Do You Think I’m Crazy?: Feminine and Feminist Humour in the Absurd’. As a Creative Writing PhD researcher, sometimes it is difficult to gain the opportunity to disseminate my research to a wide audience. My research focuses on two main areas: my ‘creative’ work (poetry) and my ‘critical’ work (researching literary theories and trends). I rarely have the chance to talk about the latter, especially to academics and researchers outside my specialism, so the Research Poster Conference offered the chance to receive some much-needed peer review.

The exercise of creating a poster to share your research is helpful in terms of identifying the key aspects and terms of your project. Firstly, you must engage your audience! I was encouraged to think of an interesting title for my poster to gain attention. By asking a question (‘Do You Think I’m Crazy?’), I managed to engage a variety of people – they were intrigued, and wanted to know the answer. You have limited space on a poster, so you must identify the key points of your research: this is incredibly helpful, as it reminds you of the key ideas behind your project. Once you have identified these, you can start thinking about discussing your project with a variety of audiences. Posters shouldn’t be too text-heavy, so after identifying the key points, you can think about how to sum up your research succinctly and clearly: this will certainly help in future discussions about your work!

When presenting at the Research Poster Conference – whether to judges, other researchers, or members of the public – it was essential that my presentation was accessible. I quickly learned that what thought was ‘accessible’ might not be to people outside my discipline! I learnt to adapt very quickly and explain some of my key terms in a comprehensible way. It is important to think about the impact that your research has (or will have), and the impact of your research will certainly increase if you can share it with more people.

I previously mentioned that peer-review was a major benefit of the conference. The Research Poster Conference draws a large and varied crowd; this meant that many people saw my poster and presentation, and could offer feedback. It was incredibly helpful to see my research from another perspective: some people were able to question my conclusions and the logic behind them, whilst others allowed me to defend my point of view and articulate my reasons. As a result, I was able to highlight areas of my research that needed work, and also interrogate my arguments to ensure that they were sound. I came away from the conference with some clear ideas about what I needed to do to improve my thesis.

The Research Poster Conference offers you a great chance to engage in your development as a researcher; you will disseminate your research to a large and varied audience, consider the key ideas of your research, and receive feedback on your work.

This year, the Research Poster Conference is taking place on 15th June 2017, and applications for abstracts are currently open until 3rd April 2017.

If you would like to take part this year, you can find more information about applying to the Research Poster Conference at the University Graduate School website

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