*NEW* Web of Science Citation Connection

This week Vicky Wallace, our Library Subject Advisor for the College of Life and Environmental Sciences, introduces us to the new ‘Web of Science Citation Connection’

University of Birmingham researchers now have access to ‘Web of Science Citation Connection’.  This package includes a wealth of databases, allowing you to retrieve a great deal more than journal articles; namely information on:
Books:  offering book and book chapter literature searching, and the option to browse within a book to its book chapters, to see where the chapters have been cited.

Data: Search for datasets used by others and gain credit/citations for your own.  The Data Citation Index links the data behind the research to the literature.

Patents: Read accessible summaries of patents written by experts, linked to the original patent.  You can see citations to the patents to help you identify potential competitors/collaborators.

In addition, the package also includes Specialist Subject Databases including BIOSIS Citation Index, Current Chemical Reactions, Index Chemicus, and Zoological Records.

The new package gives us access to these databases for 2010 onwards.

Making the most of Citation Connection

Not sure how useful these resources will be to you?  Use FindIt@Bham to select ‘Web of Science’ (All Databases), undertake a search on your topic, and then use the “document types” filter to see the range of resource types returned alongside the usual journal articles.  Refine and explore the results.

Search Core Collection (Web of Science Citation Indexes) to check citation metrics – calculations will be based on citations in journals and books.   More information about metrics is available on our Bibliometrics website.

Discover the data behind the literature by using Data Citation Index.  Data from stable, up-to-date, peer-reviewed and high quality repositories are indexed; the repositories can be searched or browsed.

Explore patents literature on Derwent Innovations Index.  Consisting of 3 sections (Chemical, Electrical and Electronic, Engineering), patents are harvested from patent offices worldwide, and Derwent’s specialists produce summaries, deciphering the technology to make it more understandable and more accessible.  As well as topic searching, you can search by institution, derwent classification codes and a range of other identifiers.  Explore the links between patents to see patents that share the same technology.  Check citations to the patents, and identify competitors/collaborators.

For further advice and guidance on making the most of these resources, contact your Subject Advisor in Library Services http://Intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/library/subject

 

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